Why it matters if stores smell delicious

Why it matters if stores smell delicious

Why it matters if stores smell delicious | Intelliretail.com

Smell can add ambience to your retail experience, but can the right scent really get you to stay longer and purchase more?

Consumer researchers say the answer is a pretty overwhelming affirmative. Researchers have found that smell effects consumer thoughts and spending behavior, product judgements (pdf), judgements on store environments and intentions on visiting stores.

Source: Why it matters if stores smell delicious – Quartz


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