Why Does Rude Service at Luxury Stores Make Consumers Go Back for More?

Why Does Rude Service at Luxury Stores Make Consumers Go Back for More?

Why Does Rude Service at Luxury Stores Make Consumers Go Back for More? | Intelliretail.com

For many people, the idea of purchasing a luxury product in a high-end boutique comes with the stigma of snobbery and rude salesclerks. But when they are rejected in real life,a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals that a person’s desire for brand affiliation and willingness to purchase and display the item actually increases.
“Our research highlights the fact that we are profoundly attuned to social threats and are driven to buy, wear, and use products from the very people who are disrespectful to us,” write authors Morgan K. Ward (Southern Methodist University) and Darren W. Dahl (University of British Columbia).

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