What’s in a Brand Name?

What's in a Brand Name? #eklectic

What’s in a brand name? No really, what do they put in it? It’s a curious thing that a mere brand name can persuade us to engage emotionally with a product or company. Sometimes, we even develop an unwitting loyalty or long-lasting aversion to a brand, though we might know little about the product. How is this possible? The old Shakesperian adage would have us believe that “a rose by any other name would smell as sweet” but how does this really play out in the world of brand names?

An article in the New York Times on corporate rebranding highlighted how problematic it can be to name an entity in a way that is both appealing and informative.

Source: What’s in a Brand Name: the Sounds of Persuasion | JSTOR Daily


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