What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?

At an Apple event in 1998, Steve Jobs introduced the iMac, explaining the link between “i” and “Mac.”

Jobs followed these statements with a slide that expanded upon what else the “i” means to Apple:

  • internet 
  • individual 
  • instruct 
  • inform 
  • inspire 

Since then, the “i” has moved beyond its Internet-centric meaning; Apple probably didn’t have the Internet in mind when naming the original iPod.

But as Apple continues to grow into other markets, including smartwatches and TV boxes, its famous prefix seems to be falling to the wayside. Instead of iWatch and iTV, we have Apple Watch and Apple TV. Perhaps this is because we no longer need to know our devices connect to the Internet — it’s something we’ve come to expect.

Source:  Here’s what the ‘i’ in iPhone means


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