The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later

The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later | Eklectic Consulting

This year marks the 50th anniversary of eclectic Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan’s famous work, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, which builds upon his famous aphorism: “The medium is the message.”

Understanding Media propelled McLuhan into the realm of pop-culture priesthood.

Twenty years ago, in the introduction to a re-print of Understanding Media, renowned editor Lewis H. Lapham wrote that much of what McLuhan had to say made a lot more sense in 1994 than it did in 1964, what with two terms of Reagan and the creation of MTV. Twenty years after that, the banality of McLuhan’s ideas have solidified their merit.

Don’t have a copy of McLuhan’s Understanding Media? Get it here!

Source: The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society


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