The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know

The denim world is no longer a dictatorship but a democracy. Each day you can cast your vote for whatever jean you see fit, trends be damned.

With so many varieties available, shopping for denim can be overwhelming. We’ve broken down the huge variety of today’s most popular styles to help you navigate the vast blue jeans seas, and to properly exercise your freedom of choice.

Source: The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know

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