The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More

The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More | eklectic.in

Often called drip campaigns but known by many other names—drip marketing, automated email campaign, lifecycle emails, autoresponders and marketing automation—the concept is the same: they’re a set of marketing emails that will be sent out automatically on a schedule. Perhaps one email will go out as soon as someone signs up, another will go out 3 days later, with one more going out the next weekend. Or, the emails can be varied based on triggers, or actions the person has performed like signing up for your service or making a purchase, which is why they’re also sometimes called behavioral emails.

Source: What is Drip Marketing? The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More – The Zapier Blog – Zapier


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