The big list of little things that destroy your customer experience

We often spend too much time focusing on ‘big’ things (technology advancements, business transformation etc etc) and tend to forget, or neglect, the myriad of ‘little’ things in our businesses that we could improve. Individually, these little things do not threaten the success of the business but collectively hey can pose a serious, but not obvious, threat to our businesses and the customer experiences that we are aiming to deliver. Here’s around 90 different responses from an eclectic group of smart, knowledgeable and savvy professionals offer a great insight into the things that they believe damage their personal customer experience.




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