How to Choose Where to Sit For Dinner At A Restaurant

Designer Alex Cornell helps you figure out how to choose the best seat, or at least “how not to get stuck next to someone that sucks,” with this helpful infographic.

One of the most complex social situations you will encounter is the 45 seconds that elapse while deciding where to sit for dinner at a restaurant. Your choice should appear natural, unbiased and haphazard if executed properly. Timing is everything.

These 45 seconds determine how enjoyable your next 2 hours will be. Once the pieces start to fall into place and people take their seats, your choices narrow. People sit, seemingly at random, and if you don’t take the appropriate measures, you’re inevitably stuck at the least interesting end of the table.

Source: How to Choose Where to Sit




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