How Technology has changed product placement

How Technology has changed product placement | www.eklectic.in

With recent advances, companies can now use algorithms to digitally serve you unique product placements based on where you live, your age or your salary. It’s a creepy concept, but it could change advertising forever.

As Swedish DJ Avicii nonchalantly wanders into Stockholm’s Tele2 Arena, the music video of his hit “Lay me Down” starts. As he strolls past the venue’s reception; a Grand Marnier poster gets some vital screen time. Everywhere else in the world, the brand is never seen — a plain wall lies in its place. It’s one of the first examples of a new kind of temporary product placement called “digital insertion.”


Source: Technology changed product placement (and you didn’t even notice)


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