How Supermarkets Get You To Buy More Junk Food

How Supermarkets Get You To Buy More Junk Food


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All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know

All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know


All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know

It's no exaggeration to say Alibaba has revolutionized the lives of China's consumers. Offering one-stop shopping for everything from toothpaste to cars, it's responsible for 80% of China's e-commerce market, which is already or soon to be the world's biggest. In the second quarter of 2014, Alibaba sold more than Amazon and eBay combined. Source: All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know | Global News - Advertising Age Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think attribution is in error email us

The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades

The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades


The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades

The Grocery Shrink Ray is what we call it when the manufacturers of food and consumer goods make their products smaller––sometimes almost imperceptibly smaller––rather than raise prices. You know what it looks like: it’s why your toilet paper doesn’t quite fill the holder anymore, and why you don’t get as many servings of hot chocolate as you used to. We know that it’s been in action for decades, but is there proof? Yes: one need only turn to collectors of consumer ephemera like boxes and cans. Source: The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades – Consumerist Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Psychology Of Free Samples

The Psychology Of Free Samples


The Psychology Of Free Samples

People love free, people love food, and thus, people love free food. Retailers, too, have their own reasons to love sampling, from the financial (samples have boosted sales in some cases by as much as 2,000 percent) to the behavioral (they can sway people to habitually buy things that they never used to purchase). It’s true that free samples help consumers learn more about products, and that they make retail environments more appealing. But samples are operating on a more subconscious level as well. “Reciprocity is a very, very strong instinct,” says Dan Ariely, a behavioral economist at Duke University. “If somebody does something for you”—such as giving you a quarter of a ravioli on a piece of wax paper—“you really feel a rather surprisingly strong obligation to do something back for them.” Source: The Psychology Behind Costco's Free Samples - The Atlantic Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

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