Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store

Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store

Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store | IntelliRetail.com

What has happened to that great American archetype, the penny-pinching bargain shopper?

Americans were once known to love a good deal; this is the country that invented ending every price with “$.99” Add to that the US economy has been less than robust for the past six years, marked by a recession leading into a rocky, dissatisfying recovery that includes a weak housing market and 10 million people out of work.

Source: Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store | Money | theguardian.com


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