Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts

Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts | www.eklectica.in #eklectica

On July 27, 1940, Billboard magazine, the trade journal for the music business, started publishing a weekly list of the best-selling records across the country, under the heading of “The Billboard Music Popularity Chart.”

The “Music Popularity Chart” was presented as a “trade service feature,” intended to provide market information for the benefit of wholesalers and retailers trying to decide what to stock, radio programmers trying to figure out what to play on the air, and songwriters and producers looking for cues on styles to mimic and trends to exploit. The chart in that issue in 1940 listed ten records,

Source: Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts: Why Are Songs So Sad? | The New Republic


Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us




Related posts

Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age

Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age


Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age

Business cards have been around a long time in one form or another. The Chinese invented calling cards in the 15th century to give people notice that they intended to visit. European merchants invented trade cards in the 17th century to act as miniature advertisements. They can provoke strong emotions. Nothing will provoke more discussion at a board meeting than the design of the company’s business cards. That business cards are thriving in a digital age is a forceful reminder that there is much about business that is timeless. Source: Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age | The Economist Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Marketing: What are brands for?

Marketing: What are brands for?


Marketing: What are brands for?

When Imperial Tobacco, the world’s fourth-largest cigarette-maker, said in July that it would spend $7.1 billion to expand its business in America, its chief executive, Alison Cooper, was adamant on one point: it will not be buying companies. Instead, in a three-way deal with Reynolds American and Lorillard, it will pick up a factory, a sales force and, above all, a collection of brands. Two of them, Winston and Blu (an electronic-cigarette brand), will be “the focus for the lion’s share of time and money invested”. No management expert would think it strange that Imperial would spend the best part of $7 billion on something as ethereal as brands. They are the most valuable thing that companies as diverse as Apple and McDonald’s own, often worth much more than property and machinery. Source: Marketing: What are brands for? | The Economist Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How Technology has changed product placement

How Technology has changed product placement


How Technology has changed product placement

With recent advances, companies can now use algorithms to digitally serve you unique product placements based on where you live, your age or your salary. It's a creepy concept, but it could change advertising forever. As Swedish DJ Avicii nonchalantly wanders into Stockholm's Tele2 Arena, the music video of his hit "Lay me Down" starts. As he strolls past the venue's reception; a Grand Marnier poster gets some vital screen time. Everywhere else in the world, the brand is never seen -- a plain wall lies in its place. It's one of the first examples of a new kind of temporary product placement called "digital insertion." Source: Technology changed product placement (and you didn't even notice) Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Leave a comment