A murderer’s last words inspired Nike’s "Just do it"

A murderer's last words inspired Nike's

Dan Wieden, co-founder of the advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy,the agency behind Nike’s “Just do it” slogan says that the world’s most recognisable taglines was based on the words of a murderer facing a firing squad.

Gary Gilmore had robbed and murdered two men in Utah and was executed by firing squad the following year. Gilmore, who had grown up in Portland, Oregan – the city that is home to both Nike and Wieden+Kennedy, was supposed to have uttered ‘Let’s do it’ as his last words (though some say he actually said “Let’s do this”).

Dan Wieden, didn’t think ‘Let’s do it’ was quite it – so he changed it “Just do it”. And the rest, like they say, is history!

Source: Nike’s “Just do it” was based on the last words of a murderer


Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us




Related posts

Brands Are Not Your Friends

Brands Are Not Your Friends


Brands Are Not Your Friends

When was the last time Coca-Cola did anything nice for you? People tend to talk to brands on the internet like they might have lost their virginity to them. They very well may have—an empty bag of @Doritos under the mattress or in the parking lot of a @McDonalds—but it's a one-way relationship. Your sister's face has never appeared on a highway billboard, but Nestlé and Burger King show up in the same streams as your loved ones. This is the business model of the social web. Source: Brands Are Not Your Friends Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source . If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Reinvention Of Absolut

The Reinvention Of Absolut


The Reinvention Of Absolut

Absolut vodka has been around since the late nineteenth century, but the Absolut most of us know was propelled to fame by their iconic campaign with ad agency TBWA, which ran for a mind-boggling 25 years. If you were around in the ’80s and ’90s, chances are you saw the ads somewhere – plastered on a billboard, stamped on the back of a magazine. Absolut was cool. U.S. sales jumped from 10,000 cases sold in 1980, to 4.5 million cases sold in 2000. While vodka still owns roughly a quarter of spirits sales by volume in the U.S., growth has been stagnate for almost half a decade. Whiskey has now replaced vodka as the fastest growing spirit category. Why? Because it’s become completely passé to drink vodka. Not only that, but part of the appeal of the craft whiskey movement is the story behind the whiskey. You know how it goes: our distillery, built on a hundred year old farm, takes the finest corn and wheat and uses a century-old family recipe to produce the finest bourbon in all the land. These stories of so-called craftsmanship convey value that a club goer wouldn’t care about, but that a modern day, hip, self-aware drinker will. So where does Absolut find itself amidst this craft whiskey fever? It seems that they’ve seized upon this trend of “uncool” coolness. With the launch of their new vodka, Elyx, Absolut isn’t choosing to go after Goose or other vodka brands, they’re courting whiskey drinkers. Source: The Reinvention Of Absolut: How To Sell Luxury Vodka From The '80s In A Craft World | VinePair Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us


How Brand Influencers And Brand Ambassadors Are Different


How Brand Influencers And Brand Ambassadors Are Different

While on a recent Twitter Chat, someone said brand influencers and brand ambassadors were the same thing. But they’re not. There’s actually a crucial difference between the two, and it involves MONEY. And if your company or brand is looking at using in any sort of influencer marketing programs, you’ll need to know the difference. Source: How Brand Influencers And Brand Ambassadors Are Different Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Leave a comment