The Stimulating History of Coffee

You don’t speak Turkish. You don’t speak Finnish. You don’t speak Mandarin or Cantonese. None of these languages is remotely related to English. In fact, none of these languages are even in the same language family. Yet you can recognize, within the two quick syllables of kah-vay, ka-vee, and ka-fay, the word you know as coffee.

Source: Coffee cognates: Arabic qahwah, Turkish kahve, and other cross-linguistic borrowings that make this word similar around the world.


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