The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today

The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today

The mall of the future: It's nothing like today | IntelliRetail.com

Forget the fluorescent-lit indoor mall that’s been synonymous with shopping for years. The future of retail will look starkly different 25 years out.

Full-body scanners that take your measurements, and recommend the clothes that best fit your body. Seamless checkouts that can be done from inside the dressing room or on your mobile phone, eliminating the need to wait in line.

Innovations like these are already threatening to become mainstream. And, as consumers shift a larger chunk of their spending toward the Web—where they’re offered a seemingly endless pipeline of products—experts say bricks-and-mortar locations need to undergo a complete makeover to stay relevant in future decades.

Source: The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today


Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us




Related posts

Why Does Rude Service at Luxury Stores Make Consumers Go Back for More?

Why Does Rude Service at Luxury Stores Make Consumers Go Back for More?


Why Does Rude Service at Luxury Stores Make Consumers Go Back for More?

For many people, the idea of purchasing a luxury product in a high-end boutique comes with the stigma of snobbery and rude salesclerks. But when they are rejected in real life,a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals that a person’s desire for brand affiliation and willingness to purchase and display the item actually increases. “Our research highlights the fact that we are profoundly attuned to social threats and are driven to buy, wear, and use products from the very people who are disrespectful to us,” write authors Morgan K. Ward (Southern Methodist University) and Darren W. Dahl (University of British Columbia). Source Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source . If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Wal-Mart’s History Of Copying Rivals

Wal-Mart's History Of Copying Rivals


Wal-Mart's History Of Copying Rivals

GettyWalton's Five and Dime was the predecessor to Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart has a long history of stealing ideas from competitors. In a recent interview, Wal-Mart Stores CEO Doug McMillon said the tradition is part of the retailer's "DNA." "I mean going all the way back to Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton, we had a part of our DNA that was interested in learning from others," McMillon told PBS' Charlie Rose. "Copying good ideas. Don't be so proud that you can't implement a good idea." Source: Wal-Mart Founder: 'Most Everything I've Done I've Copied From Someone Else' | Business Insider India Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store

Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store


Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store

What has happened to that great American archetype, the penny-pinching bargain shopper? Americans were once known to love a good deal; this is the country that invented ending every price with "$.99" Add to that the US economy has been less than robust for the past six years, marked by a recession leading into a rocky, dissatisfying recovery that includes a weak housing market and 10 million people out of work. Source: Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store | Money | theguardian.com Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Leave a comment