The History of the Humble Pencil

The History of the Humble Pencil

The pencil’s journey into your hand has been a 500-year process of discovery and invention. It began in the countryside of northern England, but a one-eyed balloonist from Napoleon Bonaparte’s army, one of America’s most famous philosophers, and some of the world’s most successful scientists and industrialists all have had a hand in the creation and refinement of this humble writing implement. Sharpen your trusty no. 2 and get ready to take some notes. This is the story of the pencil.

Source: The Write Stuff: How the Humble Pencil Conquered the World


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