How Much Do Expiry Dates On Packaged Goods Matter?

How Much Do Expiry Dates On Packaged Goods Matter?


How Much Do Expiry Dates On Packaged Goods Matter?

Although almost everybody throws out their food once its “sell by” or expiration date arrives, not all of that food is actually bad. Those dates are just guidelines set to help give you an idea of when to use foods—not toss them away. But more interesting is the story about how these expiry dates came into being! In the early 1930s, famed gangster Al Capone began “regulating” freshness dates after a family member got ill from some expired milk. Capone acquired a milk company named Meadowmoor Dairies and lobbied the Chicago City Council to pass a law that required an expiration stamp on milk. Despite Capone’s efforts, it wasn’t until 40 years later, in the 1970s, that food labeling became law. Today you see a lot of dates in packages you buy – Packed Date, Use By, Best Used by etc. But not one of these have anything to do with the safety and freshness of your food, it merely indicates how long your food manufacturer thinks the food will retain its fresh taste. Source: The Truth About ‘Expiration’ Dates Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains

How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains


How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains

We use GPS today to guide airplanes, ships, and tractors. It keeps tabs on sex offenders and helps find oil deposits. “GPS surveys land, and builds bridges and tunnels,” Milner writes. “GPS knows when the earth deforms; it senses the movement of tectonic plates down to less than a millimeter.” GPS can tell you how long until your Uber arrives—and even let you know if someone nearby is interested in a one-night stand. The set of technological challenges that had to be solved to enable all of this was formidable. Source: How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains – Bloomberg Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?

What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?


What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?

At an Apple event in 1998, Steve Jobs introduced the iMac, explaining the link between “i” and “Mac.” Jobs followed these statements with a slide that expanded upon what else the “i” means to Apple: internet  individual  instruct  inform  inspire  Since then, the “i” has moved beyond its Internet-centric meaning; Apple probably didn’t have the Internet in mind when naming the original iPod. But as Apple continues to grow into other markets, including smartwatches and TV boxes, its famous prefix seems to be falling to the wayside. Instead of iWatch and iTV, we have Apple Watch and Apple TV. Perhaps this is because we no longer need to know our devices connect to the Internet — it’s something we’ve come to expect. Source:  Here’s what the ‘i’ in iPhone means Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know

The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know


The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know

The denim world is no longer a dictatorship but a democracy. Each day you can cast your vote for whatever jean you see fit, trends be damned. With so many varieties available, shopping for denim can be overwhelming. We’ve broken down the huge variety of today’s most popular styles to help you navigate the vast blue jeans seas, and to properly exercise your freedom of choice. Source: The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Invention of Pad Thai

The Invention of Pad Thai


The Invention of Pad Thai

Phibunsongkhram, better known as Phibun in Western historical accounts, had played a prominent role as a military officer in a coup that stripped Thailand’s monarchy of its absolute powers, and in 1938, he became prime minister. Thailand, which was then known as Siam, had never been colonized, but it was surrounded by French and British colonies. Siam was also an ethnically diverse country with strong regional identities. Worried about his country’s independence, disintegration, and, most of all, support for his rule, Phibun decided to transform the country’s culture and identity. Phibun passed 12 Cultural Mandates (which included changing the name of the country to Thailand) exhorting the Siamese people to be productive, well-mannered, and proud of their country. As part of his campaign, Phibun ordered the creation of a new national dish: pad Thai. The exact origins of pad Thai remain contested. According to some accounts, Phibun announced a competition to create a new, national dish. Phibun’s son, however, says that his family cooked the dish before Phibun made it government policy, although he does not remember who invented it. Either way, the dish’s roots are Chinese. Its full name is kway teow phat Thai. Kway teow means rice noodles in a Chinese dialect, and the entire name means stir-fried rice noodles Thai-style. Noodles and stir-frying are very Chinese, and immigration likely brought the practice to Siam. Flavors like tamarind, palm sugar, and chilies were the Thai twists. By releasing a pad Thai recipe and promoting it, Phibun turned one potential take on stir-fried noodles into a national dish – a uniquely Thai dish which would help to unify the country. Source: The Invention of Pad Thai Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

A Gentleman’s Guide to Linen

A Gentleman’s Guide to Linen


A Gentleman’s Guide to Linen

Linen shirts have long been a summer staple. Not to be confused with its denser, denim-like cousin chambray (so 2014), linen is made solely from the fibers of the flax plant. The name comes from the Latin word for the plant, linum, and it’s correspondingly one of the earliest man-made fabrics. 36,000-year-old linen fibers were discovered in Georgia in 2009. Ancient priests wore it and pharaohs were buried in it. Lately, linen is simply part of the palette of global fashion, as easy to encounter on the streets of Istanbul as Williamsburg. Source: A Gentleman’s Guide to Linen | Maxim Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

History of Solitaire, Patience, and other single-playercard games

History of Solitaire, Patience, and other single-playercard games


History of Solitaire, Patience, and other single-playercard games

Solitaire the card game most likely came about toward the end of the 18th century, perhaps “in the Baltic region of Europe and possibly as a form of fortune-telling.” The theory is that the popularity of the game rose with the popularity of cartomancy, or divination by cards, as well as tarot card reading. Moreover, in Scandinavian countries, the game is apparently known as cabale, which is related to cabal, a “mystical interpretation of the Old Testament.” Cabal gives us Kabbalah, that mystical (and trendy) form of Judaism. Source: A brief history of Solitaire, Patience, and other card games for one Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Fascinating History Of Quotation Marks

The Fascinating History Of Quotation Marks


The Fascinating History Of Quotation Marks

> The punctuation mark is a storied character. Its family tree extends all the way back to the second century BC, when its earliest ancestor sprang into being at the ancient Library of Alexandria. The so-called diple, or “double,” was an arrow-shaped character (> ) named for the two strokes of the pen required to draw it, and it was just one of a clutch of proofreading marks devised by a librarian named Aristarchus to help edit and clarify the library’s holdings. More about this in Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols, and Other Typographical Marks . Writing and punctuation were fundamentally and permanently changed by the invention of movable type. Time-consuming luxuries such as hand-painted illustrations and elaborate, decorative marks of punctuation fell victim to the economies of scale enabled by this new means of production. Quotations were rendered in alternative typefaces, enclosed in parentheses, or called out by means of non-typographic methods such as verbs of speaking. Of late, Britain’s contrarian speech marks seem to be reverting to the once and future norm, and perhaps its ‘technical’ terms will one day do the same. Until that day arrives, take heart that whether you prefer single or double quotation marks, someone, somewhere, will be in agreement with you. The quotation mark, in both its guises, is still in rude health. Source: Quotation marks: Long and fascinating history includes arrows, diples, and inverted commas Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

A Brief History of the Rubber Band

A Brief History of the Rubber Band


A Brief History of the Rubber Band

Cheap, reliable, and strong, the rubber band is one of the world’s most ubiquitous products. It holds papers together, prevents long hair from falling in a face, acts as a reminder around a wrist, is a playful weapon in a pinch, and provides a way to easily castrating baby male livestock… While rubber itself has been around for centuries, rubber bands were only officially patented less than two centuries ago. Here now is a brief history of the humble, yet incredibly useful, rubber band. Source: A Brief History of the Rubber Band Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Weird Science of Naming New Products

The Weird Science of Naming New Products


The Weird Science of Naming New Products

For decades, corporations have turned to creative people for their naming needs, with varying results. In 1955, a Ford Motor marketing executive recruited the modernist poet Marianne Moore to name the company’s new car. The marketing department had already created a list of 300 candidates, all of which, the executive confessed, were “characterized by an embarrassing pedestrianism.” Could the poet help? In a series of letters, Moore proposed dozens of notably nonpedestrian names — Intelligent Whale, Pastelogram, Mongoose Civique, Utopian Turtletop, Varsity Stroke — but the marketing team rejected them all, instead naming the new car (in one of the great disasters, naming and otherwise, in corporate history) after Henry Ford’s son, Edsel. Today roughly 500,000 businesses open each month in the United States, and every one needs a name. Source: The Weird Science of Naming New Products – NYTimes.com Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

A Brief History of Kissing in Movies

A Brief History of Kissing in Movies


A Brief History of Kissing in Movies

Who was your first kiss? Not the actual, physical kiss — that is really none of my business — but a witnessed meeting of two mouths on-screen? Was it the smooching pooches in “The Lady and the Tramp,” their lips serendipitously joined by a strand of spaghetti? Jack and Rose in the boiler room of the Titanic? Jack and Ennis in “Brokeback Mountain”? Cher and Nicolas Cage in “Moonstruck”? Or was it an older, more canonical osculation, from the era when a kiss was as far as an on-screen pair were allowed to go, with or without the benefit of clergy? Bogey and Bergman in “Casablanca”? Bergman and Cary Grant in “Notorious”? Grant and Eva Marie Saint or Grace Kelly or Katharine Hepburn? Source: A Brief History of Kissing in Movies – NYTimes.com Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Stimulating History of Coffee

The Stimulating History of Coffee


The Stimulating History of Coffee

You don’t speak Turkish. You don’t speak Finnish. You don’t speak Mandarin or Cantonese. None of these languages is remotely related to English. In fact, none of these languages are even in the same language family. Yet you can recognize, within the two quick syllables of kah-vay, ka-vee, and ka-fay, the word you know as coffee. Source: Coffee cognates: Arabic qahwah, Turkish kahve, and other cross-linguistic borrowings that make this word similar around the world. Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us