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How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains

How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains


How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains

We use GPS today to guide airplanes, ships, and tractors. It keeps tabs on sex offenders and helps find oil deposits. “GPS surveys land, and builds bridges and tunnels,” Milner writes. “GPS knows when the earth deforms; it senses the movement of tectonic plates down to less than a millimeter.” GPS can tell you how long until your Uber arrives—and even let you know if someone nearby is interested in a one-night stand. The set of technological challenges that had to be solved to enable all of this was formidable. Source: How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains – Bloomberg Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Invention of Sliced Bread

The Invention of Sliced Bread


The Invention of Sliced Bread

Throughout most of history, we either baked the bread ourselves, or bought it from bakers in giant, solid loaves — until one man revolutionized the way we consumed it. On the surface, sliced bread seems pretty simple. But it didn’t come easily: it’s an invention that endured tremendous hardships, tragedy, and years of innovation before hitting the shelves in the 1920s. It even toughed out a government ban during World War II. And it began with a tenacious inventor named Otto. Source: The Invention of Sliced Bread Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?

How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?


How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?

In the 1940s, the American military and British RAF used a spelling alphabet different from the current well-known Alfa, Bravo, Charlie. The letter “R” was used as an abbreviation for “received” back in the times when messages were send via telegraphy (in Morse code), and the practice of confirming that a transmission was received by sending an “R” back was extended to spoken radio communication at the advent of two-way radio during World War II. The phonetic alphabet used by the British and American military during the World War II was: Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, Easy, Fox, George, How, Item, Jig, King, Love, Mike, Nan, Oboe, Peter, Queen, Roger, Sugar, Tare, Uncle, Victor, William, X-ray, Yoke, Zebra When a soldier or a radio operator said “Roger” after receiving a transmission, he was simply saying “R” for “received”. The alphabet has changed since then, but the practice of replying to a message by saying “Roger” stuck. Source: Origin of the phrase “Roger that” in English Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

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