Scissors






Related posts

A Brief History of Yogurt

A Brief History of Yogurt


A Brief History of Yogurt

The word yogurt is comes from the Turkish verb “yogurmak” (to thicken). It is believed that yogurt was being made in Turkey as early as the 6th century BCE. Central Asian herdsmen, who stored their extra goat’s milk in containers made out of animal stomachs to preserve it while on the go, found to their surprise, became thick and tart; but was still edible even after a surprisingly long period of time in the hot sun. In many ancient Asian civilizations, yogurt was a part of their diet. Fans included Genghis Khan and his Mongol army – yoghurt was believed to give them strength and stamina in battle. The Indian emperor Akbar liked to spice up his yogurt with cinnamon and mustard seeds. For centuries, yogurt was made only within the home and not for mass production. Till 1005 when Blugarian microbiologist Stamen Grigorov discovered Lactobacillus bulgaricus, the bacteria strain that ferments milk into yogurt. Source

How People Photoshopped before Photoshop

How People Photoshopped before Photoshop


How People Photoshopped before Photoshop

1850s-1950s: 100 years of manipulating images without computers Prior to 1985 photographs were retouched by hand using paint or ink, pieced together in the darkroom from separate photographs. Airbrushing as a term is still in use today, though the technique originated much earlier. All these required a degree of artistic skill and, for some, access to a darkroom. See gallery on Pinterest

How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?

How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?


How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?

In the 1940s, the American military and British RAF used a spelling alphabet different from the current well-known Alfa, Bravo, Charlie. The letter “R” was used as an abbreviation for “received” back in the times when messages were send via telegraphy (in Morse code), and the practice of confirming that a transmission was received by sending an “R” back was extended to spoken radio communication at the advent of two-way radio during World War II. The phonetic alphabet used by the British and American military during the World War II was: Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, Easy, Fox, George, How, Item, Jig, King, Love, Mike, Nan, Oboe, Peter, Queen, Roger, Sugar, Tare, Uncle, Victor, William, X-ray, Yoke, Zebra When a soldier or a radio operator said “Roger” after receiving a transmission, he was simply saying “R” for “received”. The alphabet has changed since then, but the practice of replying to a message by saying “Roger” stuck. Source: Origin of the phrase “Roger that” in English Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Leave a comment