Here’s How Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop

Here’s How Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop

Here's How Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop | Intelliretail.icom

A team of researchers at Northeastern University recently analyzed how e-commerce sites tailor prices to specific shoppers based on their digital habits and demographics, such as their ZIP code. According to the study, presented last week at the Internet Measurement Conference in Vancouver, major e-commerce sites including Home Depot, Walmart, and Hotels.com list online prices that are all over the map, and in some cases, these prices are “personalized” to the behavior of particular shoppers, including whether they shop on a phone or on a desktop.

Source: Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop. Here’s How | WIRED


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