The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades

The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades


The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades

The Grocery Shrink Ray is what we call it when the manufacturers of food and consumer goods make their products smaller––sometimes almost imperceptibly smaller––rather than raise prices. You know what it looks like: it’s why your toilet paper doesn’t quite fill the holder anymore, and why you don’t get as many servings of hot chocolate as you used to. We know that it’s been in action for decades, but is there proof? Yes: one need only turn to collectors of consumer ephemera like boxes and cans. Source: The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades – Consumerist Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937

Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937


Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937

Who enjoys struggling with microscopic barcodes and unmarked bits of produce in the self-checkout lane? Nobody? Too bad; self-automated modules are here to stay. With a few exceptions, virtually every new grocery store in America is asking consumers to do a bit of work at the end of their trip, reducing face-to-face interaction with employees and, theoretically, overhead costs. Self-checkout feels like a product of the disconnected Internet age, but in fact, the concept is nearly 80 years old. Next time you openly swear at a fritzing scanner, direct the sentiment at Clarence Saunders. Born 1881 to a Virginia tobacco farmer, Saunders spent a lifetime grasping for heights of shopping automation even greater than we know today, then falling and bootstrapping himself back up again and again. Source: Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937 – CityLab Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

What’s Wrong With Retail?

What’s Wrong With Retail?


What’s Wrong With Retail?

Best Buy is bombing out.Sears, owned by Kmart since 2005, is also sinking. And Radio Shack is a wreck. How did this all happen? First and foremost, these retailers all got caught, to varying degrees, in the muddle in the middle. Or maybe in the middle of the muddle. Today, to compete effectively, you just can’t be beige or average, and their stores and their offerings were basically “so what?” in every possible category. If you don’t stand for something in the consumer’s mind and carve out a demonstrable and defensible niche, you’re nothing. You can’t save yourself with advertising, promotions, coupons, and circulars. These days, any kind of “brute force” spray-and-pray advertising (regardless of the channel) is the unavoidable cost of being boring. Source: What’s Wrong With Retail, And What Does It Mean for You? | Inc.com Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Psychology Of Free Samples

The Psychology Of Free Samples


The Psychology Of Free Samples

People love free, people love food, and thus, people love free food. Retailers, too, have their own reasons to love sampling, from the financial (samples have boosted sales in some cases by as much as 2,000 percent) to the behavioral (they can sway people to habitually buy things that they never used to purchase). It’s true that free samples help consumers learn more about products, and that they make retail environments more appealing. But samples are operating on a more subconscious level as well. “Reciprocity is a very, very strong instinct,” says Dan Ariely, a behavioral economist at Duke University. “If somebody does something for you”—such as giving you a quarter of a ravioli on a piece of wax paper—“you really feel a rather surprisingly strong obligation to do something back for them.” Source: The Psychology Behind Costco’s Free Samples – The Atlantic Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Why it matters if stores smell delicious

Why it matters if stores smell delicious


Why it matters if stores smell delicious

Smell can add ambience to your retail experience, but can the right scent really get you to stay longer and purchase more? Consumer researchers say the answer is a pretty overwhelming affirmative. Researchers have found that smell effects consumer thoughts and spending behavior, product judgements (pdf), judgements on store environments and intentions on visiting stores. Source: Why it matters if stores smell delicious – Quartz Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know

All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know


All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know

It’s no exaggeration to say Alibaba has revolutionized the lives of China’s consumers. Offering one-stop shopping for everything from toothpaste to cars, it’s responsible for 80% of China’s e-commerce market, which is already or soon to be the world’s biggest. In the second quarter of 2014, Alibaba sold more than Amazon and eBay combined. Source: All About Alibaba: What Brands Need To Know | Global News – Advertising Age Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think attribution is in error email us

The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today

The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today


The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today

Forget the fluorescent-lit indoor mall that’s been synonymous with shopping for years. The future of retail will look starkly different 25 years out. Full-body scanners that take your measurements, and recommend the clothes that best fit your body. Seamless checkouts that can be done from inside the dressing room or on your mobile phone, eliminating the need to wait in line. Innovations like these are already threatening to become mainstream. And, as consumers shift a larger chunk of their spending toward the Web—where they’re offered a seemingly endless pipeline of products—experts say bricks-and-mortar locations need to undergo a complete makeover to stay relevant in future decades. Source: The mall of the future: It’s nothing like today Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store

Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store


Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store

What has happened to that great American archetype, the penny-pinching bargain shopper? Americans were once known to love a good deal; this is the country that invented ending every price with “$.99” Add to that the US economy has been less than robust for the past six years, marked by a recession leading into a rocky, dissatisfying recovery that includes a weak housing market and 10 million people out of work. Source: Family Dollar and the slow, surprising death of the discount store | Money | theguardian.com Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

American Consumers Aren’t Retail’s Top Priority Anymore

American Consumers Aren’t Retail’s Top Priority Anymore


American Consumers Aren’t Retail’s Top Priority Anymore

Chinese consumers have retailers’ undivided attention. Companies like Procter & Gamble and Unilever have ambushed Chinese customers with tailored assortments like green tea-flavored toothpaste. Consumer brands like Victoria’s Secret, Abercrombie & Fitch, and Old Navy are aggressively building stores in mainland China. Source: American Consumers Aren’t Retail’s Top Priority Anymore | Business Insider India Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us