The History of Brunch

The History of Brunch


The History of Brunch

The story of the brunch – meal everyone loves to hate – begins in 1896, when the tradition of a weekend not-quite-lunch made landfall in New York. Its antecedents date back to the United Kingdom and the “hunt breakfast,” where servants would prepare a day’s catch after the hunting party returned, resulting in a later-than-usual eating time. In America, the “hunt breakfast” was more along the lines of eggs and toast as opposed to venison, necessitating a new name. (Still, meat remained an integral part of brunch in the form of bacon, bacon, and more bacon.) Source: The History of Brunch, Your Favorite Meal to Hate | First We Feast Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed

Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts

Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts


Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts

On July 27, 1940, Billboard magazine, the trade journal for the music business, started publishing a weekly list of the best-selling records across the country, under the heading of “The Billboard Music Popularity Chart.” The “Music Popularity Chart” was presented as a “trade service feature,” intended to provide market information for the benefit of wholesalers and retailers trying to decide what to stock, radio programmers trying to figure out what to play on the air, and songwriters and producers looking for cues on styles to mimic and trends to exploit. The chart in that issue in 1940 listed ten records, Source: Billboard and the History of the Pop Charts: Why Are Songs So Sad? | The New Republic Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How Hashtags Work on Twitter, Instagram, Google Plus, Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, and Flickr

How Hashtags Work on Twitter, Instagram, Google Plus, Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, and Flickr


How Hashtags Work on Twitter, Instagram, Google Plus, Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, and Flickr

A hashtag is the wonder of the past decade. It was born to address the need to organize and make sense of the overwhelming social media buzz. Thanks to active and creative user adoption, hashtag support has been added to most popular social media platforms. Source: How Hashtags Work on Twitter, Instagram, Google Plus, Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, and Flickr – Moz Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

What’s in a Brand Name?

What’s in a Brand Name?


What’s in a Brand Name?

What’s in a brand name? No really, what do they put in it? It’s a curious thing that a mere brand name can persuade us to engage emotionally with a product or company. Sometimes, we even develop an unwitting loyalty or long-lasting aversion to a brand, though we might know little about the product. How is this possible? The old Shakesperian adage would have us believe that “a rose by any other name would smell as sweet” but how does this really play out in the world of brand names? An article in the New York Times on corporate rebranding highlighted how problematic it can be to name an entity in a way that is both appealing and informative. Source: What’s in a Brand Name: the Sounds of Persuasion | JSTOR Daily Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Brands Are Not Your Friends

Brands Are Not Your Friends


Brands Are Not Your Friends

When was the last time Coca-Cola did anything nice for you? People tend to talk to brands on the internet like they might have lost their virginity to them. They very well may have—an empty bag of @Doritos under the mattress or in the parking lot of a @McDonalds—but it’s a one-way relationship. Your sister’s face has never appeared on a highway billboard, but Nestlé and Burger King show up in the same streams as your loved ones. This is the business model of the social web. Source: Brands Are Not Your Friends Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source . If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More

The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More


The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More

Often called drip campaigns but known by many other names—drip marketing, automated email campaign, lifecycle emails, autoresponders and marketing automation—the concept is the same: they’re a set of marketing emails that will be sent out automatically on a schedule. Perhaps one email will go out as soon as someone signs up, another will go out 3 days later, with one more going out the next weekend. Or, the emails can be varied based on triggers, or actions the person has performed like signing up for your service or making a purchase, which is why they’re also sometimes called behavioral emails. Source: What is Drip Marketing? The Complete Guide to Drip Campaigns, Lifecycle Emails and More – The Zapier Blog – Zapier Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How Technology has changed product placement

How Technology has changed product placement


How Technology has changed product placement

With recent advances, companies can now use algorithms to digitally serve you unique product placements based on where you live, your age or your salary. It’s a creepy concept, but it could change advertising forever. As Swedish DJ Avicii nonchalantly wanders into Stockholm’s Tele2 Arena, the music video of his hit “Lay me Down” starts. As he strolls past the venue’s reception; a Grand Marnier poster gets some vital screen time. Everywhere else in the world, the brand is never seen — a plain wall lies in its place. It’s one of the first examples of a new kind of temporary product placement called “digital insertion.” Source: Technology changed product placement (and you didn’t even notice) Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us


Jerry Seinfeld Won A Clio Award, Gave Scathing Speech Mocking Advertising – Digg


Jerry Seinfeld Won A Clio Award, Gave Scathing Speech Mocking Advertising – Digg

“I think spending your lives trying to dupe innocent people out of hard-won earnings to buy useless, low-quality, misrepresented items and services is an excellent use of your energy.”  Source: Jerry Seinfeld Won A Clio Award, Gave Scathing Speech Mocking Advertising – Digg Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us


The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later


The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later

This year marks the 50th anniversary of eclectic Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan’s famous work, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man , which builds upon his famous aphorism: “The medium is the message.” Understanding Media propelled McLuhan into the realm of pop-culture priesthood. Twenty years ago, in the introduction to a re-print of Understanding Media , renowned editor Lewis H. Lapham wrote that much of what McLuhan had to say made a lot more sense in 1994 than it did in 1964, what with two terms of Reagan and the creation of MTV. Twenty years after that, the banality of McLuhan’s ideas have solidified their merit. Don’t have a copy of McLuhan’s Understanding Media? Get it here! Source: The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us