Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved

Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved


Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved

Video will not save your media business. Nor will bots, newsletters, a “morning briefing” app, a “lean back” iPad experience, Slack integration, a Snapchat channel, or a great partnership with Twitter. All of these things together might help, but even then, you will not be saved by the magical New Thing that everyone else in the media community is convinced will be the answer to The Problem. Source: Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved — Medium Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source . If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Reinvention Of Absolut

The Reinvention Of Absolut


The Reinvention Of Absolut

Absolut vodka has been around since the late nineteenth century, but the Absolut most of us know was propelled to fame by their iconic campaign with ad agency TBWA, which ran for a mind-boggling 25 years. If you were around in the ’80s and ’90s, chances are you saw the ads somewhere – plastered on a billboard, stamped on the back of a magazine. Absolut was cool. U.S. sales jumped from 10,000 cases sold in 1980, to 4.5 million cases sold in 2000. While vodka still owns roughly a quarter of spirits sales by volume in the U.S., growth has been stagnate for almost half a decade. Whiskey has now replaced vodka as the fastest growing spirit category. Why? Because it’s become completely passé to drink vodka. Not only that, but part of the appeal of the craft whiskey movement is the story behind the whiskey. You know how it goes: our distillery, built on a hundred year old farm, takes the finest corn and wheat and uses a century-old family recipe to produce the finest bourbon in all the land. These stories of so-called craftsmanship convey value that a club goer wouldn’t care about, but that a modern day, hip, self-aware drinker will. So where does Absolut find itself amidst this craft whiskey fever? It seems that they’ve seized upon this trend of “uncool” coolness. With the launch of their new vodka, Elyx, Absolut isn’t choosing to go after Goose or other vodka brands, they’re courting whiskey drinkers. Source: The Reinvention Of Absolut: How To Sell Luxury Vodka From The ’80s In A Craft World | VinePair Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Unusual Origins of 6 Famous Brands

The Unusual Origins of 6 Famous Brands


The Unusual Origins of 6 Famous Brands

Many famous brands got their start in straightforward ways. For example, agricultural machinery giant John Deere was founded in the 1830s by an Illinois blacksmith who invented an innovative plow, and candy behemoth Mars Inc. can trace its beginnings to the early 1920s, when then-struggling candy maker Frank Mars launched the Milky War bar, which proved an immediate hit. However, when it comes to other iconic brands, the stories of how they were established might surprise you. Source: The Unusual Origins of 6 Famous Brands — HISTORY Lists Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How Lego rebuilt its brand brick by brick

How Lego rebuilt its brand brick by brick


How Lego rebuilt its brand brick by brick

Lego, taking its name from ‘leg godt’, Danish for ‘play well’, began life in the early 1930s. In the 1950s the company, with founder Ole Kirk Kristiansen’s son Godtfred at the helm, introduced its system of play concept, with the interlocking plastic bricks we know today arriving in 1958. Through the introduction of its core principles of play, the company’s mission was, and still is, to inspire and develop the builders of tomorrow, enabling children to learn through play – thus ‘playing well’. But Lego’s journey hasn’t been smooth, with decades of success preceding a brush with bankruptcy, followed by its meteoric rise in recent years to become the most powerful brand in the world, according to a February study published by Brand Finance. Source: Well played – How Lego rebuilt its brand brick by brick | The Drum Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

A Brief History of the ATM

A Brief History of the ATM


A Brief History of the ATM

The cash dispenser was born almost 50 years ago, in 1967. For many, this was the first tangible evidence that retail banking was changing; the introduction of the ATM marked the dawn of contemporary digital banking. The ATM finds its origins in the 1950s and 1960s, when self-service gas stations, supermarkets, automated public-transportation ticketing, and candy dispensers were popularized. The first cash machine seems to have been deployed in Japan in the mid-1960s. The most successful early deployments took place in Europe, where bankers responded to increasing unionization and rising labor costs by soliciting engineers to develop a solution for after-hours cash distribution. This resulted in three independent efforts, each of which entered use in 1967: the Bankomat in Sweden, and the Barclaycash and Chubb MD2 in the U.K. Source: A Brief History of the ATM — The Atlantic Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

A murderer’s last words inspired Nike’s "Just do it"

A murderer’s last words inspired Nike’s "Just do it"


A murderer’s last words inspired Nike’s "Just do it"

Dan Wieden, co-founder of the advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy,the agency behind Nike’s “Just do it” slogan says that the world’s most recognisable taglines was based on the words of a murderer facing a firing squad. Gary Gilmore had robbed and murdered two men in Utah and was executed by firing squad the following year. Gilmore, who had grown up in Portland, Oregan – the city that is home to both Nike and Wieden+Kennedy, was supposed to have uttered ‘Let’s do it’ as his last words (though some say he actually said “Let’s do this”). Dan Wieden, didn’t think ‘Let’s do it’ was quite it – so he changed it “Just do it”. And the rest, like they say, is history! Source: Nike’s “Just do it” was based on the last words of a murderer Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The History of Lorem Ipsum

The History of Lorem Ipsum


The History of Lorem Ipsum

If you’re a designer, this phrase is everywhere. Known as “filler text” or “dummy copy” or “Greek copy”, people use it to simulate the appearance of whatever text will ultimately be used in a design. This way, a designer doesn’t have to wait for the text to be written to format it, and they and the client aren’t distracted from the graphical or interactive elements of the design by reading the copy. At some point, likely in the middle ages, a typesetter had to make a type specimen book, to demo different fonts, and he got the idea that if the text should be insensible, so as not to distract from the page’s graphical features. So he took a handy page of non-Biblical Latin — Cicero — and scrambled it into mostly gibberish. “Lorem” isn’t even a Latin word — it’s the second half of “dolorem,” meaning “pain” or “sorrow”. Thus Lorem Ipsum was born, and began its long journey to ubiquity. Source: The History of Lorem Ipsum Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age

Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age


Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age

Business cards have been around a long time in one form or another. The Chinese invented calling cards in the 15th century to give people notice that they intended to visit. European merchants invented trade cards in the 17th century to act as miniature advertisements. They can provoke strong emotions. Nothing will provoke more discussion at a board meeting than the design of the company’s business cards. That business cards are thriving in a digital age is a forceful reminder that there is much about business that is timeless. Source: Why the business card is thriving in the electronic age | The Economist Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How the Coke Bottle Got Its Shape

How the Coke Bottle Got Its Shape


How the Coke Bottle Got Its Shape

The Coke bottle is one of those few landmark consumer items to make the leap from consumer item to cultural icon. Millions of us drink from one of them every day, while Andy Warhol also used the bottle in his art. Marilyn Monroe once clutched a Coca-Cola bottle while clad in a polka dot bikini. How to extend its brand was a question the Atlanta-based Coca-Cola faced that question in the early 1900s. Back then Coca-Cola was packaged in a straight-sided bottle with the logo embossed on it, and “competitors like Celery Cola, Toca Cola, Mako Cola—there were over 1,200 people that tried to imitate the logo. The company got fed up, and came up with a solution: create a “distinctive package.” Source: How the Coke Bottle Got Into Shape – The Daily Beast Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source . If you think these are wrongly attributed email us