How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?

How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?


How did the phrase “Roger that” originate?

In the 1940s, the American military and British RAF used a spelling alphabet different from the current well-known Alfa, Bravo, Charlie. The letter “R” was used as an abbreviation for “received” back in the times when messages were send via telegraphy (in Morse code), and the practice of confirming that a transmission was received by sending an “R” back was extended to spoken radio communication at the advent of two-way radio during World War II. The phonetic alphabet used by the British and American military during the World War II was: Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, Easy, Fox, George, How, Item, Jig, King, Love, Mike, Nan, Oboe, Peter, Queen, Roger, Sugar, Tare, Uncle, Victor, William, X-ray, Yoke, Zebra When a soldier or a radio operator said “Roger” after receiving a transmission, he was simply saying “R” for “received”. The alphabet has changed since then, but the practice of replying to a message by saying “Roger” stuck. Source: Origin of the phrase “Roger that” in English Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The History of the Humble Pencil

The History of the Humble Pencil


The History of the Humble Pencil

The pencil’s journey into your hand has been a 500-year process of discovery and invention. It began in the countryside of northern England, but a one-eyed balloonist from Napoleon Bonaparte’s army, one of America’s most famous philosophers, and some of the world’s most successful scientists and industrialists all have had a hand in the creation and refinement of this humble writing implement. Sharpen your trusty no. 2 and get ready to take some notes. This is the story of the pencil. Source: The Write Stuff: How the Humble Pencil Conquered the World Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How Much Do Expiry Dates On Packaged Goods Matter?

How Much Do Expiry Dates On Packaged Goods Matter?


How Much Do Expiry Dates On Packaged Goods Matter?

Although almost everybody throws out their food once its “sell by” or expiration date arrives, not all of that food is actually bad. Those dates are just guidelines set to help give you an idea of when to use foods—not toss them away. But more interesting is the story about how these expiry dates came into being! In the early 1930s, famed gangster Al Capone began “regulating” freshness dates after a family member got ill from some expired milk. Capone acquired a milk company named Meadowmoor Dairies and lobbied the Chicago City Council to pass a law that required an expiration stamp on milk. Despite Capone’s efforts, it wasn’t until 40 years later, in the 1970s, that food labeling became law. Today you see a lot of dates in packages you buy – Packed Date, Use By, Best Used by etc. But not one of these have anything to do with the safety and freshness of your food, it merely indicates how long your food manufacturer thinks the food will retain its fresh taste. Source: The Truth About ‘Expiration’ Dates Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

A Brief History of Yogurt

A Brief History of Yogurt


A Brief History of Yogurt

The word yogurt is comes from the Turkish verb “yogurmak” (to thicken). It is believed that yogurt was being made in Turkey as early as the 6th century BCE. Central Asian herdsmen, who stored their extra goat’s milk in containers made out of animal stomachs to preserve it while on the go, found to their surprise, became thick and tart; but was still edible even after a surprisingly long period of time in the hot sun. In many ancient Asian civilizations, yogurt was a part of their diet. Fans included Genghis Khan and his Mongol army – yoghurt was believed to give them strength and stamina in battle. The Indian emperor Akbar liked to spice up his yogurt with cinnamon and mustard seeds. For centuries, yogurt was made only within the home and not for mass production. Till 1005 when Blugarian microbiologist Stamen Grigorov discovered Lactobacillus bulgaricus, the bacteria strain that ferments milk into yogurt. Source

Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved

Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved


Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved

Video will not save your media business. Nor will bots, newsletters, a “morning briefing” app, a “lean back” iPad experience, Slack integration, a Snapchat channel, or a great partnership with Twitter. All of these things together might help, but even then, you will not be saved by the magical New Thing that everyone else in the media community is convinced will be the answer to The Problem. Source: Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved — Medium Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source . If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains

How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains


How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains

We use GPS today to guide airplanes, ships, and tractors. It keeps tabs on sex offenders and helps find oil deposits. “GPS surveys land, and builds bridges and tunnels,” Milner writes. “GPS knows when the earth deforms; it senses the movement of tectonic plates down to less than a millimeter.” GPS can tell you how long until your Uber arrives—and even let you know if someone nearby is interested in a one-night stand. The set of technological challenges that had to be solved to enable all of this was formidable. Source: How GPS Came to Be—and How It May Be Altering Our Brains – Bloomberg Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?

What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?


What does the ‘i’ in iPhone really mean?

At an Apple event in 1998, Steve Jobs introduced the iMac, explaining the link between “i” and “Mac.” Jobs followed these statements with a slide that expanded upon what else the “i” means to Apple: internet  individual  instruct  inform  inspire  Since then, the “i” has moved beyond its Internet-centric meaning; Apple probably didn’t have the Internet in mind when naming the original iPod. But as Apple continues to grow into other markets, including smartwatches and TV boxes, its famous prefix seems to be falling to the wayside. Instead of iWatch and iTV, we have Apple Watch and Apple TV. Perhaps this is because we no longer need to know our devices connect to the Internet — it’s something we’ve come to expect. Source:  Here’s what the ‘i’ in iPhone means Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know

The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know


The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know

The denim world is no longer a dictatorship but a democracy. Each day you can cast your vote for whatever jean you see fit, trends be damned. With so many varieties available, shopping for denim can be overwhelming. We’ve broken down the huge variety of today’s most popular styles to help you navigate the vast blue jeans seas, and to properly exercise your freedom of choice. Source: The denim dictionary: Every jean style you need to know Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Invention of Pad Thai

The Invention of Pad Thai


The Invention of Pad Thai

Phibunsongkhram, better known as Phibun in Western historical accounts, had played a prominent role as a military officer in a coup that stripped Thailand’s monarchy of its absolute powers, and in 1938, he became prime minister. Thailand, which was then known as Siam, had never been colonized, but it was surrounded by French and British colonies. Siam was also an ethnically diverse country with strong regional identities. Worried about his country’s independence, disintegration, and, most of all, support for his rule, Phibun decided to transform the country’s culture and identity. Phibun passed 12 Cultural Mandates (which included changing the name of the country to Thailand) exhorting the Siamese people to be productive, well-mannered, and proud of their country. As part of his campaign, Phibun ordered the creation of a new national dish: pad Thai. The exact origins of pad Thai remain contested. According to some accounts, Phibun announced a competition to create a new, national dish. Phibun’s son, however, says that his family cooked the dish before Phibun made it government policy, although he does not remember who invented it. Either way, the dish’s roots are Chinese. Its full name is kway teow phat Thai. Kway teow means rice noodles in a Chinese dialect, and the entire name means stir-fried rice noodles Thai-style. Noodles and stir-frying are very Chinese, and immigration likely brought the practice to Siam. Flavors like tamarind, palm sugar, and chilies were the Thai twists. By releasing a pad Thai recipe and promoting it, Phibun turned one potential take on stir-fried noodles into a national dish – a uniquely Thai dish which would help to unify the country. Source: The Invention of Pad Thai Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Hidden Stories In Your Kitchen

The Hidden Stories In Your Kitchen


The Hidden Stories In Your Kitchen

Look around your kitchen. Big or small, it’s probably full of gadgets and tools. We use these things daily, but we never think that hard about where they came from in the first place. Look closer, though: There are hidden stories in your kitchen. | www.eklectica.xyz #eklectica See the hidden stories in your kitchen here. Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us